Tomorrow Can Be Now!

Life is only as we see it. Contrary to the consensus belief, it isn’t bound by existing theories, the laws of physics or what our parents told us we’d become. In essence, our abilities and the possibilities within our sphere of existence are only limited to our imaginations.
This fact has been proven time and again by the numerous astounding discoveries that destroyed the credence of those made before them for example the discovery that the earth was actually round which eliminated the previous theories that it was flat. What would have happened if Galilleo had refrained from investigating the issue at a time when the Church had already made their inflexible conclusions? All humanity would have been psychologically living on a flat earth now; restricted in all ramifications by the geometry our ancestors’ thinking had limited us to. The point is that if great men had accepted the already laid down generally accepted facts, they wouldn’t have made the discoveries that have kept various spheres of life constantly evolving, especially the inventions in the world of technology. Nowadays, it can even be mathematically proven 1+1 equals zero!
It all boils down to the things we think we can or can’t accomplish and here lies the true strength of a man- the strength of his belief. People all have different aims and dreams in life which we have postponed for “when I grow older” or “when I become rich” or even “when I get married”. These are people that aren’t sure if they’ll see tomorrow. Yet they secure that special activity for a perfect comfortable future time as though privy to the human lifespan master plan.
Personally, I was challenged at a reprimand the 2010 Common Wealth prize winner Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani had lashed out on sluggish writers in a newspaper article last year. “You don’t have to wait for the birds to be chirping in c-minor to write…”
While it maybe wise to postpone or allocate a certain activity to a certain stage of our lives, we might also need to expand our perspective on what it really is. Or can be. For example, you might like to view it as a lottery race down the mall aisle where you get to pack as much goodies as you can before time goes out.
Why wait till you’re 20 to become that music star, why wait till you finish school before you become that model? In other advanced countries, you’d find child stars in almost every field from science to entertainment. Most of them might not even be genius-grade talented in their fields, but at that young age they decided what they wanted to be become and got trained, and achieved their dreams in a heartbeat. They don’t wait for graduation to start working; they rarely even wait for 20 to move out of their parent’s house.
It might also be that the thing occupying your now and making you procrastinate might have nothing to do with your destiny. Rampant in this country is the sorry case of people being educated in fields other than passion. You find child-prodigies in mathematics being forced to study medicine and talented artists reading engineering in higher institutions. Why? Because of the generally accepted limitations imposed by the society on these individuals. “My son would never be an actor!”, “female guitarists are not marketable in the music industry” and so on.
While it is right to live by the standards of one’s immediate society it is also necessary to remember this society would not share your regrets with you in old age or at your dying moments. It won’t share your personal burdens and strife as you try to find your path in life. It will only claim you when you excel all expectations, but regect you if you fail. So in a sense, we really are all on our own.
‘Someday’ never was and never will be a day of the week. Always ask yourself, “If I don’t take action now, what will it ultimately cost me?” Brendan Francis said “inspirations never go in for a long engagement; they must be immediately married to action”. I say one must act now, because if we keep waiting for tomorrow, we’d wake up one day and realize it was long gone in the past.

TJ Benson

TJ Benson is a Nigerian youth of mixed tribal heritage but principally Tiv, Idoma and Igbo. Loves and embraces art in its various forms and sees it as a means of changing the world for the better. He loves cooking, badminton, poetry, movies and studying the human psyche asides writing. He is currently working on his debut novel, 'Finding Eden' Keep up with me on twitter @Tarfa_Jay

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3 Responses

  1. Obinna Onyema says:

    The importance of always acting at the right time cannot be overstressed. Procrastination kills the time we ought to use to build dreams. With well thought out plans a man acting at the right time would reap immense benefits from what he does.

  2. james says:

    goodstuff!

  3. pamela says:

    thats truely stated